The New Orleans rapper and songwriter known as E.D. Nix has released his latest official LP album, “Community Service.” It has been proudly published on the Blvxk Supremc Creative Collective independent record label without the involvement of the corporate music industry. It features the additional talents of Jambalaya Johnny, Shayne Tone, T.Y., Kendal Banks, and Nem Venom. A rolling groove pumping with bass and packed with polished lines and rhymes, “Community Service” is an LP album to put E.D. Nix on the map not just in the bayou, but in the global hip-hop community at large.

E.D. Nix is a southern rapper who doesn’t feel obliged to perform the “dirty south” sound. Asked to cite some main artistic influences, he writes, “Everything. I’m pretty open minded. I literally will give anything a chance. Artistic influences are too many to name. But I’m hugely influenced by where I’m from.”

His style comes largely from the mid-late nineties when lyric delivery reigned supreme, long before ubiquitous autotune and nonstop digital effects seized hip hop. Nix considers his music self-explanatory, which it is, and presents himself with a mellow, humble attitude, both of which he also is.

“I’m an open book on top of the private shelf,” E.D. Nix writes of the themes of his new album. “The knowledge is there, the substance is there, the lifestyle is real. I’m not perfect but I ain’t stupid. This music provides a little substance with dope beats. I’m just telling real stories on some gangsta-ass tracks and people miss that shit.”

E.D. Nix can wax modest, but he’s also a very successful artist in 2018 with much more to come.

“I’m not trying to change the world,” Nix says, “I’m just vibing everyday trying to put it together. I used to be in the in the 7th ward plotting on 6 figure ‘licks.’ Now I’m a major piece in a Fortune 100 company, and I own my own. Things could be so much different for me, but I get to make music, movies and do dope sh-t, and I think anybody that listens to my music should be able to grasp that perspective.”

Another source describes E.D. Nix as the “Self-made underground King of New Orleans.” In a review of his third solo release, an LP titled “Sözè,” the author says Nix “has developed into one of the budding stars of the entertainment industry. In Film Beaucoup de Force Nix stepped into the role of Music Supervisor. Since the August release of this short film, 3517 Law Street Productions and Nix’s company, Grande Scheme GG, have worked tirelessly on such projects as Neutral Grounds, which provides cinematic visuals for ‘Sözè.’”

In his hometown of New Orleans, E.D. Nix is most renowned for his spot as a radio personality on the area’s first black-owned station, WBOK 1230AM. His Sports Revolution program boasts an average daily audience of over 60,000 listeners.

E.D. Nix’s style has been called “influenced by the jazzy heritage of his hometown while having been raised in the classic nineties era” and notes that Nix has introduced what he calls “New Age Hip Hop.” Nix has ascribed his first two projects, “On My Way Home” (2011) and “Higher Earning” (2012) to this category.

Elsewhere Nix is described as “not your average ‘rapper’” but also “an extremely shrewd businessman and very witty merchandiser.” The New Orleans hip-hop performer is supported by such brands as BXBC Luxury, the legendary DJ EF Cuttin, 2520 NYC, Hip Hop DNA, the Cigar Factory, Mixtape108, and the Urban Push Movement.

“Community Service” by E.D. Nix is available from Blvxk Supremc Creative Collective at over 600 quality digital music retailers online worldwide now.

-S. McCauley

Lead Press Release Writer

www.MondoTunes.com

“Community Service” by E.D. Nix –

https://www.amazon.com/Community-Service-Explicit-D-Nix/dp/B0795QT9WV/

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About BothEyesShut

BothEyesShut is your friendly autodidact, at your service to amuse, enthuse, and offend you with a fresh, steady flow of original disinformation. He was born in Huntington Beach, CA and is currently writing his fifth novel. "In a Real World, This Would Be Happening" is his first return to non-fiction since his monthly column in Going Coastal magazine in 2001. He lives in Long Beach.

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